Are males always right?

When pointing out monomorphic birds (species in which the males and female look exactly alike) I call out their names without hesistation: 'That's Ferguson. Say hi to Olivia, his mate." I'll point to a pair of birds that are indistinguishable to most people, and know instantly which are male and which are female. Sometimes, I am asked about how I do it. I generally ask the questioner to guess. "How do you think I do it?" I might respond. Or "Guess how." The answers range from the wary, "You don't really know, but since we don't either, you just pick out any one to be the girl and the other to be the boy" to the scholarly,"Could be the way the bird moves or the sound the bird makes." I tell the responder that in fact, there are many species of birds in which behavior is a good indicator of sex. In the Ringneck dove family, for example, the males are the only who bow. Well, not always. Sometimes, rare females will also bow, but not often.In the Crown pigeon family, only the males do the deep bowing and make the BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! sound that is the mating call of the male. The answer to how I tell males from females was guessed by a grade school girl. To be fair, her answer was not a guess, but the result of observation. She noticed that most of our birds are banded. We put bands on our birds so that we can keep track of individual birds, monitor their health and their weight. Depending on the species of the bird, the bands are either made of metal or plastic. They are either colored or they have a number on them or both. Regardless of which band we use, and which bird species is involved, there is something that we keep constant. We follow the old time bird breeding practice of banding male birds on the right and females on the left. How do I remember this? The person who taught me how to band was trying to get a rise out of me. He asked me if I knew the basis for the practice of bands for male birds going on their right, and those of females going on the left. I shook my head and admitted that I didn't know. He smiled, delighted that I had fallen into his trap. "Because men are always right," he announced. He then slapped his knee and laughed loudly at his own joke. I've never forgotten which foot to put a band on, so maybe that old coot was right. Remind me next time to tell you what old time breeders say if you complain that a pair of birds you've purchased are both of the same sex...